Supreme Court Act 1935

Supreme Court (Court of Appeal) Rules 2005

 

Supreme Court (Court of Appeal) Rules 2005

Contents

Part 1 — Preliminary

1.Citation1

2.Commencement1

3.Interpretation1

4.Application of these rules4

5.Application of the Rules of the Supreme Court 19714

Part 2 — Delegated jurisdiction

Division 1 — General

5A.Delegated jurisdiction may be exercised by Court of Appeal6

6.Hearings by telephone6

Division 2 — Single judge’s jurisdiction

7.General jurisdiction6

Division 3 — Reviewing decisions by a single judge

8.Application for review by Court of Appeal7

9.Dealing with the application8

Division 4 — Registrar’s jurisdiction

10.General jurisdiction8

11.Registrar may refer questions to single judge or Court of Appeal9

12.Hearing before single judge or registrar, parties to be notified10

13.Written order by registrar, issue and service of10

Division 5 — Reviewing decisions by a registrar

14.Interpretation11

15.Application for review by single judge11

16.Dealing with the application12

Division 6 — Miscellaneous

17.Non-attendance by party, consequences of12

18.Decisions made in absence of a party12

19.Decisions made on the papers13

Part 3 — Administrative matters

20.Forms, completion of14

21.Filed documents, technical requirements15

22.Filed documents to be served16

Part 4 — Duties of lawyers who act for parties

23.Duty to notify when acting for a party17

24.Presumptions as to who is acting for a party17

Part 5 — Procedure for appeals

Division 1 — General

25.Nature of appeals19

26.Time for appealing19

26A.Parties to appeals19

Division 2 — Commencing an appeal

27.When an appeal is taken to be commenced19

28.Criminal appeal, how to commence20

29.Civil appeal, how to commence21

30.Primary court to be notified and to supply records21

31.Respondent’s options22

31A.Cross appeals23

32.“Appellant’s case” to be filed23

33.“Respondent’s answer” to be filed27

34.Appellant’s reply to notice of contention, when required30

Division 3 — Appeal books

35.Appeal book, when required31

36.Indexes, settling of31

37.Appeal book, general provisions33

38.Appeal book, contents of33

39.Appeal book, technical requirements36

40.Sentence appeal, appeal book for37

41.Appeal book to be prepared by appellant38

Division 4 — Matters prior to the hearing of any appeal

42.Application of Division38

42A.Matters requiring leave39

43.Single judge’s jurisdiction39

44.Interim order, applying for41

45.Consenting to orders41

46.Urgent appeal order, nature of41

47.Case management42

48.Applications for adjournments to be made promptly43

49.Offers of compromise43

50.Court to be advised immediately of settlement etc.44

Division 5 — Matters prior to the hearing of a criminal appeal

51.Application of Division44

52.Applications for certain orders under CAA s. 40(1)44

53.Single judge’s jurisdiction44

54.Witnesses required by the Court of Appeal44

55.Proceedings before an examiner45

56.Special commissioners and assessors (CAA s. 40(1))46

Division 6 — Hearing an appeal

57.Hearing date to be set47

Division 7 — Concluding an appeal

59.Discontinuing an appeal47

60.Settling an appeal48

61.Guideline judgments48

62.Criminal appeals, certificate of conclusion of49

63.Other appeals, final orders on49

64.Return of exhibits50

65.Enforcing judgments and orders51

66.Costs51

Part 6 — Referred and other CA matters

67.Referring a legal issue to the Court of Appeal53

68.Dealing with referred and other CA matters54

Part 7 — Miscellaneous

69.Removal of District Court appeal into Court of Appeal56

Schedule 1 — Forms

1.Appeal notice (criminal) (r. 28)57

2.Appeal notice (civil) (r. 29)59

3.Service certificate (r. 28(7) & 29(5))60

4.Notice of respondent’s intention (r. 31)60

4A.Notice of respondent’s cross appeal (r. 31A)61

5.Lawyer’s notice of acting (Part 4)62

5A.Service certificate by lawyer ceasing to act (r. 24(3))62

6.Notice of self-representation (r. 24)63

7.Appellant’s case (r. 32)63

8.Respondent’s answer (r. 33)64

9.Application in an appeal (r. 44)65

10.Consent notice (r. 45 & 60)66

11.Affidavit cover sheet (r. 21(3))66

12.Request for hearing (r. 19)67

13.Application for review of single judge’s or registrar’s decision (r. 8 & 15)67

14.Appeal book, cover page (r. 39(5))68

14A.Certificate of correctness of appeal book (r. 41(c))68

15.Notice of hearing date (r. 57)69

16.Discontinuance notice (r. 59)69

17.Certificate of conclusion of criminal appeal (r. 62)70

18.Referral of legal issue to Court of Appeal (r. 67)71

Notes

Compilation table72

Defined terms

 

Supreme Court Act 1935

Supreme Court (Court of Appeal) Rules 2005

Part 1  Preliminary

1.Citation

These rules are the Supreme Court (Court of Appeal) Rules 2005.

2.Commencement

These rules come into operation on 2 May 2005, or on the day on which they are published in the Gazette, whichever is the later.

3.Interpretation

(1)In these rules, unless the contrary intention appears —

Act means the Supreme Court Act 1935;

appeal includes an application for leave to appeal;

appeal notice means a notice in the form of Form 1 or 2, as the case requires;

appellant includes an applicant for leave to appeal or for an extension of time within which to appeal or apply for leave to appeal;

CA matter means any cause or matter, however described, that, under the Act section 58(1) or any other written law, the Court of Appeal has jurisdiction to hear and determine;

civil appeal means any appeal to the Court of Appeal that is not a criminal appeal;

concluded, in relation to a CA matter, means decided, dismissed or discontinued;

criminal appeal means an appeal under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 Part 2 Division 3 or Part 3;

decision includes decree, determination, direction, judgment and order;

file a document, means to file it at the Court of Appeal Office in the Supreme Court together with any fee required to be paid under the Supreme Court (Fees) Regulations 2002;

Form, if followed by a number, means the form of that number in Schedule 1 completed in accordance with these rules;

interim order in an appeal, means —

(a)a suspension order made under the Civil Judgments Enforcement Act 2004 section 15;

(b)an order staying the proceedings in the primary court or the execution of the primary court’s decision;

(c)an order made under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 12 or 29;

(d)an order granting bail made under the Bail Act 1982;

(e)an urgent appeal order;

(f)an order that an appellant provide security for a respondent’s costs;

(g)an order that extends or shortens the time for obeying —

(i)a requirement of these rules, other than the time for commencing an appeal; or

(ii)an order made under these rules;

(ga)an order granting leave for any matter for which leave is required under rule 42A;

(h)any other order that the Court of Appeal may make before the appeal is concluded, other than an order giving or refusing to give leave to appeal;

interlocutory civil appeal means an appeal from an interlocutory decision made in civil proceedings in the General Division by a judge or master;

lawyer means a certificated practitioner within the meaning of the Legal Practice Act 2003;

party means a party to a CA matter;

primary court, in relation to an appeal, means the court, tribunal, person or body that made the decision being appealed;

primary court’s decision in an appeal, means the decision of the primary court that is the subject of the appeal;

primary court’s transcript means —

(a)the transcript of the proceedings in the primary court; or

(b)if there is no electronic recording of the proceedings that can be transcribed —

(i)the notes made by the judicial officer who presided at the proceedings; and

(ii)one or more affidavits of people who were present at the proceedings about what happened in the proceedings;

record means any thing or process —

(a)on or by which information is recorded or stored; or

(b)by means of which a meaning can be conveyed by any means in a visible or recoverable form,

whether or not the use or assistance of some electronic, electrical, mechanical, chemical or other device or process is required to recover or convey the information or meaning;

registrar means —

(a)the Court of Appeal Registrar;

(b)a registrar directed under section 155(4) of the Act to assist the Court of Appeal Registrar;

RSC means the Rules of the Supreme Court 1971;

sentence appeal means a criminal appeal that is solely an appeal against a sentence;

single judge means a judge of appeal sitting alone;

urgent appeal order has the meaning given by rule 46;

working day means a day other than a Saturday, a Sunday, or a public holiday in Perth.

(2)A term defined in the RSC has the same meaning in these rules as it has in the RSC, unless the contrary intention appears.

(3)Examples in these rules do not form part of them and are provided to assist understanding.

[Rule 3 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4517‑18.]

4.Application of these rules

(1)These rules apply to and in respect of any CA matter.

[(2)deleted]

(3)The President may direct that some of these rules (specified in the direction) apply to and in respect of a class of CA matters (specified in the direction).

[Rule 4 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4518.]

5.Application of the Rules of the Supreme Court 1971

(1)These rules must be read with the RSC.

(2)For the purposes of subrule (1) —

(a)a reference in the RSC to the RSC (whether “these Rules” or other words are used) is to be taken as including a reference to these rules, unless the context requires otherwise;

(b)a reference in these rules to these rules (whether “these rules” or other words are used) is to be taken as including a reference to the RSC, unless the context requires otherwise; and

(c)a single judge has jurisdiction to exercise any power of the Court or the Court of Appeal under those rules, unless the contrary intention appears.

(3)If there is a conflict or inconsistency between these rules and the RSC, these rules prevail.

(4)The RSC Order 3, other than rules 2(2) and 5(3), applies for the purposes of these rules.

Part 2 — Delegated jurisdiction

Division 1 — General

5A.Delegated jurisdiction may be exercised by Court of Appeal

A delegation by these rules of jurisdiction to a single judge or a registrar does not —

(a)limit the jurisdiction of the Court of Appeal; or

(b)prevent the Court of Appeal from exercising the jurisdiction.

[Rule 5A inserted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4518.]

6.Hearings by telephone

(1)A single judge or a registrar may conduct a hearing with one or more of the parties to a CA matter by telephone.

(2)A hearing conducted by telephone is to be taken to be a hearing in the presence of the judge or registrar.

(3)A registrar must confirm in writing any order made at such a hearing.

[Rule 6 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543.]

Division 2 — Single judge’s jurisdiction

7.General jurisdiction

(1)For the purposes of exercising the jurisdiction conferred by any other rule on a single judge, a single judge has jurisdiction —

(a)to make a decision on the application of a party or on the judge’s own initiative;

(b)to decide an application on the basis of the documents filed and without listing it for hearing;

(c)to make a decision on the judge’s own initiative on the basis of the documents filed and without requiring the parties to attend a hearing;

(d)to hear and decide an application in the absence of any party other than the applicant;

(e)to order some or all of the parties to an application to do one or more of the following in respect of the application, or any aspect of it specified by the judge —

(i)to file, before a date set by the judge, any document specified by the judge that the judge considers will or may facilitate the application being conducted and concluded efficiently, economically and expeditiously;

(ii)to appear and make oral submissions on a date set by the judge;

(f)to limit the time a party has to make oral submissions at a hearing;

(g)to order some or all of the parties to an appeal to attend a hearing.

(2)If a single judge makes a decision on the basis of the documents filed without requiring the parties to attend a hearing, rule 19 applies.

[Rule 7 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4519.]

Division 3 — Reviewing decisions by a single judge

8.Application for review by Court of Appeal

(1)If under the Act section 61(3) a person who is dissatisfied with a decision made by a single judge in a CA matter wants to apply to the Court of Appeal to set aside or vary the decision, the person must file a Form 13 within 5 working days after the date of the decision.

(2)If a single judge dismissed the CA matter, an application may be made under the Act section 61(3) despite the dismissal.

(3)Except as provided in subrule (2), an application made under subrule (1) does not stay the single judge’s decision or the CA matter unless the Court of Appeal orders otherwise.

9.Dealing with the application

(1)Part 5 Division 4 applies to and in respect of an application made under rule 8 as if the application were an appeal.

(2)The application will be decided —

(a)if necessary, at a hearing before the CA matter itself is heard; or

(b)otherwise at the hearing of the CA matter.

(3)If the Court of Appeal decides that the application will be heard before the CA matter itself is heard, the registrar must notify the parties to the hearing.

(4)If a single judge dismissed the CA matter and the Court of Appeal sets aside the decision, the CA matter is reinstated.

Division 4 — Registrar’s jurisdiction

10.General jurisdiction

(1)A registrar may refuse to accept for filing any document that is required or permitted by these rules, or an order made under these rules, if it does not obey these rules or any order made under these rules.

(2)A registrar has the same jurisdiction in respect of a CA matter as a single judge has under these rules, but does not have jurisdiction to do any of the following —

(a)to make an order that concludes the CA matter;

(b)to extend or to refuse to extend the time within which to appeal;

(c)to give or refuse to give leave to appeal or to adjourn the question to the hearing of the appeal;

(d)to make a suspension order under the Civil Judgments Enforcement Act 2004 section 15;

(e)to make an order in an appeal staying the proceedings in the primary court or the execution of the primary court’s decision;

(f)to make an order under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 12, 27, 29 or 40(1)(d), (e), (f), (g), (h) or (l);

(g)to grant bail under the Bail Act 1982;

(h)to exercise the jurisdiction conferred on a single judge by rule 49(2) or 64(5).

(3)For the purposes of exercising the jurisdiction conferred on a registrar, a registrar has the same jurisdiction as a single judge has under rule 7(1).

[Rule 10 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4519 and 4543.]

11.Registrar may refer questions to single judge or Court of Appeal

(1)A registrar may at any time refer any of the following to a single judge —

(a)any question arising in respect of a CA matter or its conduct, or of an order made under these rules;

(b)any breach of these rules or an order made under them;

(c)any application for an order that a registrar has jurisdiction to make,

and may make an order pending the judge’s decision.

(2)The single judge may deal with it or refer it back to the registrar with or without directions.

(3)If under these rules a registrar may refer any question or other matter to a single judge, the registrar may instead refer it to the Court of Appeal and may make an order pending the Court of Appeal’s decision.

[Rule 11 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4520 and 4543.]

12.Hearing before single judge or registrar, parties to be notified

(1)If a single judge or a registrar decides that a hearing of any matter within, respectively, a single judge’s or the registrar’s jurisdiction is necessary, a registrar must notify the parties of the hearing.

(2)The notice issued by a registrar —

(a)must be in a form approved by the President; and

(b)must state the matters that will be dealt with at the hearing.

(3)The notice must be served on the party at least 3 clear working days before the date of the hearing.

(4)The notice to a party may be served —

(a)by posting it to the party’s address for service;

(b)if the party has given a fax number for service, by sending the notice to the party by fax at that number;

(c)if the party has given an email address for service, by sending the notice to the party as an attachment to an email sent to that address.

[Rule 12 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543.]

13.Written order by registrar, issue and service of

(1)A registrar may at any time issue a written order to any or all of the parties to a CA matter for the purpose of requiring the party or parties to obey a requirement of these rules.

(2)Such an order —

(a)may be issued to a party without having notified or heard the party;

(b)must state a date on or before which the written order must be obeyed; and

(c)must be served on the party at least 3 clear working days before the date on which the party has to obey it.

(3)Rule 12(4), with any necessary changes, applies to the service of such an order.

(4)This rule does not limit a registrar’s other powers under these rules to make orders at a hearing.

[Rule 13 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543‑4.]

Division 5 — Reviewing decisions by a registrar

[Heading amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4544.]

14.Interpretation

In this Division, unless the contrary intention appears —

reviewable decision means a decision made by a registrar under these rules, other than these —

(a)a decision made under rule 11;

(b)a decision to list a CA matter;

(c)a decision made as a Taxing Officer.

[Rule 14 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4520.]

15.Application for review by single judge

(1)A party who is dissatisfied with a reviewable decision may apply to a single judge to set aside or vary it.

(2)An application under subrule (1) must be made by filing a Form 13 within 5 working days after the date of the reviewable decision.

(3)An application made under subrule (1) does not stay the reviewable decision or the CA matter unless a single judge orders otherwise.

16.Dealing with the application

A single judge has jurisdiction to decide an application made under rule 15 and in doing so must consider afresh the matter that was decided by a registrar.

[Rule 16 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543.]

Division 6 — Miscellaneous

17.Non-attendance by party, consequences of

(1)Subject to the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 35, if a hearing before a single judge or a registrar is adjourned because a party who has been notified of it does not attend, the judge or registrar may order the party or the party’s lawyer to pay the costs of any party who attended.

(2)If a party who has been notified of a hearing does not attend the hearing before a single judge or a registrar, the judge or registrar may proceed in the party’s absence.

[Rule 17 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543.]

18.Decisions made in absence of a party

(1)If a single judge or a registrar makes a decision in a party’s absence, whether or not at a hearing, the judge or registrar may subsequently, but before the decision is carried out, set aside the decision and again deal with the matter that gave rise to the decision.

(2)If in a party’s absence a single judge or a registrar makes a decision in a CA matter, whether or not at a hearing, the registrar must notify the party of the decision.

[Rule 18 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543‑4.]

19.Decisions made on the papers

(1)This rules applies if another rule says it applies.

(2)If a decision is made under the other rule on the basis of the documents filed without requiring the parties to attend a hearing (the provisional decision), a registrar must serve the parties with written notice of the provisional decision.

(3)If a party wants a hearing of the matter that gave rise to the provisional decision, the party must file a Form 12 within 5 working days after the date on which the party is served with the notice of the provisional decision.

(4)If no party lodges a Form 12 under subrule (3), the provisional decision becomes the final decision on the matter.

(5)If any party lodges a Form 12 under subrule (3), a registrar must list the matter for hearing by the judge who made the provisional decision or, if he or she is absent, before another, and notify the parties.

(6)At the hearing the provisional decision may be confirmed, amended or set aside.

(7)The decision made at the hearing is the final decision on the matter.

(8)Any right to appeal against, or to make an application as a result of or in respect of, a final decision on a matter cannot be exercised in relation to a provisional decision until it becomes a final decision.

[Rule 19 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543.]

Part 3 — Administrative matters

20.Forms, completion of

(1)This rule is in addition to the RSC Order 69.

(2)When completing a form in Schedule 1 —

(a)the name of a party must be capitalised according to the preference of the party; and

(b)the family name of a party must be underlined.

[Examples: Vincent van Gogh; Wong Hei; Mary Jane Citizen.]

(3)A party completing a form in Schedule 1 must adapt the form to the circumstances of the CA matter, such as where there is more than one respondent.

(4)If an item in a form in Schedule 1 does not have enough space to complete it, the party completing it must —

(a)insert in the item “See attachment [number]”; and

(b)attach to the form a separate document headed “[name of form] attachment [number] — [name of the item]”.

[Example: A single attachment to Form 13 for the item “Grounds of this application” will be headed:

[Appeal No.]

Form 13: Application for review of single judge’s decision
Attachment 1 — Grounds of this application”.

”.]

(5)If a form in Schedule 1 is filed to which is attached one or more other documents, each attached document —

(a)must not repeat the formal heading on the form; and

(b)must bear the Court of Appeal’s file number; and

(c)must bear any heading required by subrule (4) or any other rule.

(6)A person, other than a registrar, who signs a form in Schedule 1 must print their full name below their signature.

[Rule 20 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4520‑1.]

21.Filed documents, technical requirements

(1)Unless these rules provide otherwise or a single judge orders otherwise, any document that is filed —

(a)must use durable white A4 paper; and

(b)must, in order to allow the document to be bound with others, have a 5 cm margin on the left of the first side of each sheet of paper and, if the sheet is printed on both sides, a 5 cm margin on the right of the second side of each sheet of paper; and

(c)must comply with subrule (1A); and

[(d)deleted]

(e)if it is more than one page long —

(i)must have its pages numbered consecutively in the top right corner; and

(ii)may be printed on both sides of each sheet of paper;

and

(f)if it contains more than one sheet of paper, must be stapled in the top left corner or otherwise bound.

(1A)The textual content of any document that is filed, including any endnotes, footnotes and quotations, must be typed using —

(a)at least the size of type used for these rules (12 point Times New Roman); and

(b)a line spacing of at least 1.5.

(2)Subrules (1) and (1A) do not apply to a document that is not prepared for a CA matter by a party to the matter.

(3)An affidavit that is filed must have a cover sheet in the form of Form 11.

(4)If a document that is not a form in Schedule 1 is filed, it must be in a format that is consistent with the forms in Schedule 1.

[Rule 21 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4521.]

22.Filed documents to be served

(1)Unless these rules expressly provide otherwise or a single judge orders otherwise, a person who files a document in an appeal must serve it on the other party or parties within 3 working days after the date on which it is filed.

(2)The document must be served in accordance with the RSC Order 72.

Part 4  Duties of lawyers who act for parties

23.Duty to notify when acting for a party

(1)On being instructed to act for a party to an appeal as a solicitor, whether or not also as counsel, a lawyer must file a Form 5 as soon as practicable.

(2)Subrule (1) does not apply to a lawyer whose name and address for service is on a Form 1, 2 or 4 that has been filed.

24.Presumptions as to who is acting for a party

(1)A lawyer who is said to be acting for a party by reason of a Form 1, 2, 4 or 5 that has been filed is to be taken to be acting for the party until —

(a)another lawyer files a Form 5 under rule 23; or

(b)the party files a Form 6 notifying the Court of Appeal that the party is self-represented; or

(c)the Court of Appeal gives leave for the lawyer to cease to act.

(2)If the Court of Appeal gives leave for a lawyer to cease to act for a party, the lawyer is taken to be continuing to act for the party until the lawyer has complied with subrule (3).

(3)The lawyer must —

(a)serve the order giving leave on the party; and

(b)file a Form 5A (Service certificate by lawyer ceasing to act) that —

(i)certifies the party has been served; and

(ii)states the party’s last known geographical address in accordance with Order 71A rule 2 of the RSC.

(4)The last known geographical address of the party stated in Form 5A is taken to be the party’s service details until —

(a)another lawyer files a Form 5 under rule 23; or

(b)the party notifies the Court of Appeal of a change of the party’s service details.

[Rule 24 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4522‑3.]

Part 5 — Procedure for appeals

Division 1 — General

25.Nature of appeals

An appeal to the Court of Appeal will be by way of a rehearing unless another written law provides otherwise.

26.Time for appealing

(1)An interlocutory civil appeal to the Court of Appeal must be commenced within 14 days after the date of the decision being appealed.

(2)Unless another written law expressly provides otherwise, any other appeal to the Court of Appeal must be commenced within 21 days after the date of the decision being appealed.

26A.Parties to appeals

(1)Each person who would be directly affected by the relief sought in an appeal must be made a respondent to the appeal.

(2)In an appeal, the primary court must not be made a respondent unless the Court of Appeal orders otherwise.

(3)A person cannot be made an appellant in an appeal without their consent.

(4)Subject to subrule (3), the Court of Appeal may order that a person be added as a party and may order a party to be removed.

[Rule 26A inserted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4523.]

Division 2 — Commencing an appeal

27.When an appeal is taken to be commenced

An appeal is not commenced until an appeal notice (with any other document required by rule 28 or 29) has been both filed and served in accordance with rule 28 or 29, as the case requires.

28.Criminal appeal, how to commence

(1)To —

(a)commence a criminal appeal within time; or

(b)apply for an extension of time within which to commence a criminal appeal,

the appellant must file and then serve —

(c)a Form 1; and

(d)any document required by subrule (2).

(2)If the Form 1 says that an extension of time within which to commence the appeal is needed, the form must be filed with an affidavit by the applicant or the applicant’s lawyer or both explaining why the appeal was not commenced within time.

(3)A Form 1 may be filed together with an application, made in accordance with rule 44, for an interim order.

(4)For the purposes of the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 17 or 28(2), a Form 1 filed in accordance with this rule is to be taken to be an application for leave to appeal.

(5)In a criminal appeal the appellant, when preparing the grounds of appeal for the appellant’s case under rule 32, may amend or omit any of the draft grounds of appeal in the appellant’s Form 1, and may include additional grounds of appeal.

(6)Any document filed under this rule must be served on the respondent personally but, if the appellant is in custody, it may be served on the respondent by post.

(7)As soon as practicable after serving the respondent the appellant must file a Form 3 (Service certificate).

(8)This rule does not affect the operation of the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 28.

29.Civil appeal, how to commence

(1)To —

(a)commence a civil appeal (including an appeal that requires leave to appeal) within time; or

(b)apply for an extension of time within which to commence a civil appeal (including an appeal that requires leave to appeal),

the appellant must file and then serve —

(c)a Form 2; and

(d)any document required by subrule (2).

(2)If the Form 2 says that an extension of time within which to commence the appeal is needed, the form must be filed with an affidavit by the applicant or the applicant’s lawyer or both explaining why the appeal was not commenced within time.

(3)A Form 2 may be filed together with an application, made in accordance with rule 44, for an interim order.

(4)Any document filed under this rule must be served on the respondent personally.

(5)As soon as practicable after serving the respondent the appellant must file a Form 3 (Service certificate).

[Rule 29 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4523.]

30.Primary court to be notified and to supply records

(1)In this rule —

primary court case means the action, case, matter or proceedings in the primary court in which the decision being appealed was made.

(2)As soon as practicable after an appeal notice is filed, a registrar must give the primary court concerned —

(a)a copy of the appeal notice; and

(b)a notice that specifies —

(i)the records or things held by the primary court in relation to the primary court case that the primary court must give to the Court of Appeal for the purposes of the appeal; and

(ii)the date by which the primary court must provide the records or things.

(3)Any copy of a document given by the primary court to the Court of Appeal need not be certified by the primary court.

(4)If any record given to the Court of Appeal contains information to which access by any person is or should be restricted, the primary court must advise the Court of Appeal.

[Rule 30 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543.]

31.Respondent’s options

(1)On being served with an appeal notice, a respondent may file a Form 4.

(2)If the respondent files a Form 4, it must be filed within 7 days after the date on which the respondent is served with the appeal notice.

(3)A Form 4 may be filed together with an application, made in accordance with rule 44, for an interim order.

(4)If a respondent does not file a Form 4, the respondent —

(a)is not entitled to receive or be served with any document filed for the purposes of the appeal, unless a single judge orders otherwise; and

(b)is not entitled to take part or be heard in the appeal; and

(c)is not a party to the appeal for the purposes of these rules.

[(5)deleted]

[Rule 31 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4524.]

31A.Cross appeals

(1)If under rule 31 a respondent files a Form 4, the respondent may also appeal (cross appeal) against the decision specified in the appellant’s appeal notice.

(2)To commence a cross appeal, a respondent must file a Form 4A within 7 days after the date on which the respondent is served with the appeal notice.

(3)These rules apply to a cross appeal to the same extent as they apply to an appeal, unless a single judge orders otherwise in a particular case.

(4)After a respondent cross appeals, a registrar must —

(a)set the time within which the respondent must file documents in respect of the cross appeal that correspond to the “Appellant’s case” referred to in rule 32; and

(b)set the time within which the appellant must file documents in respect of the cross appeal that correspond to the “Respondent’s answer” referred to in rule 33.

[Rule 31A inserted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4524‑5.]

32.“Appellant’s case” to be filed

(1)After an appeal notice is filed, the appellant must file the “Appellant’s case”.

(2)The appellant’s case must be filed —

(a)in an interlocutory civil appeal, within 14 days after the date on which the appeal notice is filed;

(b)in any other appeal, within 35 days after the date on which the appeal notice is filed.

(3)The appellant’s case consists of a Form 7 to which is attached —

(a)in an interlocutory civil appeal or a sentence appeal, these documents —

(i)a document titled “Appellant’s grounds of appeal”;

(ii)a document titled “Appellant’s submissions”;

(iii)a document titled “Appellant’s legal authorities”;

(iv)a document titled “Orders wanted”;

(v)a document titled “Draft appeal book indexes”;

(b)in any other appeal, these documents —

(i)a document titled “Appellant’s grounds of appeal”;

(ii)a document titled “Appellant’s submissions”;

(iii)a document titled “Appellant’s legal authorities”;

(iv)a document titled “Orders wanted”;

(v)a document titled “Draft chronology”;

(vi)a document titled “Draft appeal book indexes”.

(4)The document titled “Appellant’s grounds of appeal” —

(a)must contain all of the grounds of appeal on which the appellant intends to rely at the hearing of the appeal; and

(b)must state the grounds, and concise particulars of them, succinctly in numbered paragraphs and must not merely allege —

(i)that the primary court erred in fact or in law; or

(ii)that the primary court’s decision is against the evidence or the weight of evidence or is unreasonable and cannot be supported having regard to the evidence; or

(iii)that the primary court’s decision is unsafe or unsatisfactory; or

(iv)in the case of an appeal against a sentence, that the sentence is excessive or inadequate;

and

(c)must state, for each ground, whether it is —

(i)an error of fact; or

(ii)an error of law; or

(iii)an error of mixed fact and law;

and

(d)must identify, by reference to the paragraph number or page number of the reasons for the primary court’s decision, each passage where each such error is alleged to occur; and

(e)if, under the written law under which the appeal is made, an appeal lies only if it is on or involves a question of law, must state the question of law.

(5)The document titled “Appellant’s submissions” —

(a)must, for each ground of appeal, contain the appellant’s written submissions (or argument) expressed so as to convey the substance of them clearly and as succinctly as possible; and

(b)must set out the submissions about the ground in numbered paragraphs; and

(c)must include references to —

(i)each page number of the primary court’s transcript on which relevant material appears; and

(ii)the number of each exhibit, and a description of any other piece of documentary evidence, in the primary court that is relevant; and

(iii)each principal legal authority on which the appellant relies in support of the ground;

and

(d)must not be more than 20 pages long; and

(e)must include the signature and below it the printed name of the person who prepared it.

(6)The document titled “Appellant’s legal authorities” —

(a)must list, and number consecutively, each principal legal authority to which the Court of Appeal is referred, under these headings in this order —

(i)“Written laws”;

(ii)“Judgments”;

(iii)“Legal texts”;

and

(b)must mark with an asterisk any legal authority from which it is intended to read any text to the Court of Appeal at the hearing; and

(c)for each written law listed, include its short title, its jurisdiction and each relevant section or provision of it; and

[Example:
Written laws:

*1. Interpretation Act 1984 (WA) s. 5 “under”; s. 61.

2. Acts Interpretation Act 1901 (Cth) s. 22(1).]

(d)for each judgment listed, include —

(i)first, its citation in an authorised law report (if any) and any page of it on which is a relevant passage; and

(ii)second, its media neutral citation (if any).

[Example:
Judgments:

*3. Ward v The Queen (2000) 23 WAR 254 at 274; [2000] WASCA 413 at [106].

4. Talbot v Lane (1994) 14 WAR 120.]

and

(e)for each authoritative legal text listed, refer to the edition concerned and to each relevant passage.

(7)The document titled “Orders wanted” must set out —

(a)the orders that the appellant wants the Court of Appeal to make; and

(b)if in a criminal appeal the appellant wants the Court of Appeal to give a guideline judgment — the guidelines that it is proposed the court should give.

(8)The document titled “Draft chronology” must state succinctly in numbered paragraphs arranged in date order the date and facts of each event that is material to the appeal.

(9)The document titled “Draft appeal book indexes” must set out for each of the 3 parts of the appeal book a draft index of the proposed contents of the part, being the documents required by rule 38 to be in the part.

[Rule 32 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4525‑7.]

33.“Respondent’s answer” to be filed

(1)In this rule —

appellant’s grounds of appeal means the appellant’s grounds of appeal as modified by any order made under rule 43.

(2)After being served with the appellant’s case, the respondent must file the “Respondent’s answer”.

(3)The respondent’s answer must be filed —

(a)in an interlocutory civil appeal, within 14 days after;

(b)in any other appeal within 21 days after,

the date the respondent is served with a notice issued by a registrar requiring the answer to be filed.

(4)The respondent’s answer consists of a Form 8 to which is attached —

(a)in an interlocutory civil appeal, these documents —

(i)a document titled “Respondent’s submissions”;

(ii)if the respondent seeks to uphold the primary court’s decision on a ground not relied on by the primary court — a document titled “Respondent’s notice of contention”;

(iii)a document titled “Respondent’s legal authorities”;

(iv)a document titled “Reply to the appellant’s draft indexes”;

(b)in a sentence appeal, these documents —

(i)a document titled “Respondent’s submissions”;

(ii)a document titled “Respondent’s legal authorities”;

(iii)a document titled “Reply to the appellant’s draft indexes”;

(c)in any other appeal, these documents —

(i)a document titled “Respondent’s submissions”;

(ii)if the respondent seeks to uphold the primary court’s decision on a ground not relied on by the primary court — a document titled “Respondent’s notice of contention”;

(iii)a document titled “Respondent’s legal authorities”;

(iv)a document titled “Reply to the appellant’s draft chronology”;

(v)a document titled “Reply to the appellant’s draft indexes”.

(5)The document titled “Respondent’s submissions” must, in respect of each of the appellant’s grounds of appeal, either concede the allegation in the ground or —

(a)set out in numbered paragraphs all of the submissions that the respondent makes about the ground; and

(b)include references to —

(i)each page number of the primary court’s transcript on which relevant material appears; and

(ii)the number of each exhibit, and a description of any other piece of documentary evidence, in the primary court that is relevant; and

(iii)each principal legal authority on which the respondent relies.

(6)Rule 32(5), with any necessary changes, applies to the document titled “Respondent’s submissions”.

(7)The document titled “Respondent’s notice of contention” must —

(a)state succinctly in numbered paragraphs each ground, not relied on by the primary court, on which the respondent relies to uphold the primary court’s decision; and

(b)in respect of each such ground, set out in numbered paragraphs the respondent’s submissions together with references to —

(i)each page number of the primary court’s transcript on which relevant material appears; and

(ii)the number of each exhibit in the primary court that is relevant; and

(iii)each principal legal authority on which the respondent relies in support of the ground.

(7A)Rule 32(5), with any necessary changes, applies to the document titled “Respondent’s notice of contention”.

(8)Rule 32(6), with any necessary changes, applies to the document titled “Respondent’s legal authorities”.

(9)The document titled “Reply to the appellant’s draft chronology” must, in respect of the appellant’s chronology, either state that the respondent agrees the chronology is correct or —

(a)identify any errors the respondent alleges exists; and

(b)list any events that the respondent alleges ought to be included or excluded.

(10)The document titled “Reply to the appellant’s draft indexes” must, in respect of each of the appellant’s draft appeal book indexes, either state that the respondent agrees the indexes are correct or —

(a)identify any errors the respondent alleges exists; and

(b)list any documents that the respondent alleges ought to be included or excluded from the contents of the appeal book.

[Rule 33 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4527‑8.]

34.Appellant’s reply to notice of contention, when required

(1)If as part of the respondent’s answer, a respondent files a “Respondent’s notice of contention”, the appellant must file a document titled “Appellant’s reply to respondent’s notice of contention” within 21 days after the day on which the appellant is served with it.

(2)The document titled “Appellant’s reply to respondent’s notice of contention” must, in respect of each ground in the “Respondent’s notice of contention”, either concede the allegation in the ground or —

(a)set out in numbered paragraphs all of the submissions that the appellant makes about the ground; and

(b)include references to —

(i)each page number of the primary court’s transcript on which relevant material appears; and

(ii)the number of each exhibit in the primary court that is relevant; and

(iii)each principal legal authority on which the appellant relies.

(3)Rule 32(5), with any necessary changes, applies to the document titled “Appellant’s reply to respondent’s notice of contention”.

[Rule 34 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4528‑9.]

Division 3 — Appeal books

35.Appeal book, when required

(1)An appeal book, containing the documents required for the hearing of the appeal, is required for every appeal, unless a single judge orders otherwise in a particular appeal.

(2)If, in a criminal appeal, the Court of Appeal orders that the application for leave to appeal is to be heard by itself and separately from the appeal, an appeal book is not required, unless a single judge orders otherwise.

[Rule 35 inserted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4529.]

36.Indexes, settling of

(1)If draft appeal book indexes are filed in an appeal, a registrar must settle the indexes as soon as practicable after the respondent’s answer is filed.

(2)When settling the appeal book indexes a registrar must —

(a)ensure rule 37(2) is obeyed; and

(b)reduce as far as possible the number and length of the documents to be included in the appeal book; and

(c)avoid unnecessary duplication in the appeal book of documents or the information in them; and

(d)if the respondent also appeals against the primary court’s decision, ensure that the appeal book also contains the documents required for the hearing of the respondent’s appeal.

(3)A registrar has jurisdiction —

(a)to order that any document that is or may be needed to decide the appeal, including a document not mentioned in or excluded by rule 38(2), (3) or (4), be included in an appeal book;

(b)to order that any document, including a document mentioned in rule 38(2), (3) or (4), be excluded from an appeal book;

(c)to order that the documents in an appeal book be in a different order to that required by rule 38(2), (3), (4) or (5);

(d)to order that the contents of 2 or more parts of an appeal book be amalgamated in 1 part;

(e)to make orders as to the form or content or both of any document in an appeal book;

(f)to order that an electronic version of the transcript of proceedings in a primary court be used instead of a printed transcript (or parts of it) in the appeal book;

(g)to order which party or parties are to prepare the appeal book.

(4)If a registrar settles the appeal book indexes in the absence of a party the registrar must give the party a copy of them and may do so by fax or email.

(5)The appellant must file a clean copy of the settled appeal book indexes on or before the date set by the registrar when settling them.

[Rule 36 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4529‑30 and 4543‑4.]

37.Appeal book, general provisions

The appeal book for an appeal must conform to rules 38 and 39 except to the extent that rule 40 provides otherwise or a single judge orders otherwise.

[Rule 73 inserted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4530.]

38.Appeal book, contents of

(1)Subject to rule 40, an appeal book must be comprised of 3 separate parts as follows —

(a)the first part, comprised of as many numbered volumes as are necessary with white covers, to be referred to as the “White Appeal Book”;

(b)the second part, comprised of as many numbered volumes as are necessary with light blue covers, to be referred to as the “Blue Appeal Book”;

(c)the third part, comprised of as many numbered volumes as are necessary with light green covers, to be referred to as the “Green Appeal Book”.

(2)The White Appeal Book must contain these documents in this order —

(a)a cover page;

(b)an index, with page numbers, of the book’s contents;

(c)the appeal notice;

(ca)any notice of the respondent’s intention (Form 4);

(cb)any notice of a cross appeal by the respondent (Form 4A);

(d)any order extending the time within which to appeal;

(e)any order giving leave to appeal;

[(f)deleted]

(g)the appellant’s case filed under rule 32 as amended by any order made under rule 43 but without —

(i)the draft chronology; and

(ii)the draft appeal book indexes;

(h)the respondent’s answer filed under rule 33 but without —

(i)the reply to the appellant’s draft chronology; and

(ii)the reply to the appellant’s draft indexes;

(i)the chronology, if it is required and has been agreed by the parties;

(j)if a chronology is required but has not been agreed by the parties —

(i)the draft chronology filed under rule 32 as part of the appellant’s case; and

(ii)the reply to the appellant’s draft chronology filed under rule 33 as part of the respondent’s answer;

(k)the signed Form 14A (Certificate of correctness of appeal book), required by rule 41(c);

(l)any other document filed in the Court of Appeal that a registrar orders to be included.

(3)The Blue Appeal Book must contain these documents in this order —

(a)a cover page;

(b)an index, with page numbers, of the book’s contents;

(c)the primary court’s formal decision;

(d)the primary court’s written reasons for its decision, if any;

(e)if the appeal is against a primary court’s decision in civil proceedings at first instance — the relevant pleadings in the primary court in their final form;

(f)if the appeal is against a primary court’s decision in criminal proceedings at first instance the prosecution notice or indictment, as the case requires;

(g)if the appeal is against a primary court’s decision in an appeal — the documents filed in the primary court for the appeal;

(h)any other document filed in the primary court that a registrar orders to be included.

(4)The Green Appeal Book must contain these documents in this order —

(a)a cover page;

(b)an index, with page numbers, of the book’s contents;

(c)unless an order has been made that an electronic version of the transcript is to be used, those parts of the primary court’s transcript required by subrule (4A);

(d)a copy of those documentary exhibits in the primary court required by subrule (4A) arranged in accordance with subrule (5);

(e)if the appeal is a sentence appeal or a criminal appeal that includes an appeal against a sentence — the accused’s antecedent report and criminal record, as provided to the primary court;

(f)any other document containing evidence considered by the primary court when making its decision that a registrar orders to be included.

(4A)In the Green Appeal Book, the documents referred to in subrule (4)(c) and (d) must be only those, or those parts of those, that are referred to specifically in —

(a)the appellant’s case; or

(b)the respondent’s answer; or

(c)the respondent’s notice of contention; or

(d)the appellant’s reply to the respondent’s notice of contention,

unless a registrar orders otherwise.

(5)The documentary exhibits in the primary court must be arranged in the Green Appeal Book in the order in which they are lettered or numbered as exhibits in the primary court, unless a registrar orders otherwise.

(6)The Green Appeal Book must not contain —

(a)in a civil appeal — interrogatories or answers to them, an affidavit verifying discovery, or any other affidavit, unless and to the extent that they or it were admitted in evidence in the primary court;

(b)in a criminal appeal — a pre-sentence report or a victim impact statement or a confidential medical report.

[Rule 38 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4531‑2 and 4544.]

39.Appeal book, technical requirements

(1)Each document in an appeal book must be clearly legible.

(1A)A registrar may order that a document which is to be included in an appeal book and which is not clearly legible be typed or retyped, checked against the original, and certified as correct, before it is included.

(1B)A document in an appeal book must not be reduced in size from its original size unless a registrar orders otherwise.

(2)Unless it is a form in Schedule 1, each page in an appeal book must have every fifth line on the page numbered, or letters placed beside the text at 50 mm intervals, in the left margin.

(3)The pages in each part of an appeal book, other than the cover page and the pages of the index, must be numbered consecutively, even if the part comprises 2 or more volumes.

(4)Each volume of each part of an appeal book —

(a)may but need not have a clear plastic sheet over the cover page and on the back of the volume; and

(b)must start with the cover page for that part and volume; and

(c)must contain the index for that part; and

(d)must not comprise more than more than 500 pages (which is to say 250 sheets of paper); and

(e)must have a back sheet of the colour required for that part; and

(f)must be bound so that when it is opened at a page, both sides of the volume lie flat and open at the page.

(5)The cover page of each volume of each part of an appeal book must —

(a)be in the form of Form 14; and

(b)be of durable paper of the colour required for that part.

(6)The index in each volume of each part of an appeal book must —

(a)be typed using one and a half line spacing or more; and

(b)if there are 2 or more volumes in the part, indicate which pages of the part are in which volume.

[Rule 39 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4532‑3.]

40.Sentence appeal, appeal book for

(1)The appeal book for a sentence appeal must conform to this rule except to the extent that a single judge orders otherwise.

(2)In a sentence appeal —

(a)the 3 parts of the appeal book referred to in rule 38(1) must be in one volume and in the order set out in that rule;

(b)there must be only one cover page for the appeal book;

(c)the indexes for the 3 parts of appeal book must be consolidated into one document;

(d)the pages in the appeal book, other than the cover page and the pages of the index, must be numbered consecutively;

(e)the appeal book must have white covers and be titled the “Appeal Book”; and

(f)rules 37 and 39, with any necessary changes, apply to the appeal book subject to this rule.

41.Appeal book to be prepared by appellant

(1)Unless a registrar has ordered otherwise under rule 36(3)(g), the appellant must —

(a)prepare the parts of the appeal book in accordance with the settled indexes for it and this Division; and

(b)prepare as many copies of the appeal book as the registrar orders when settling the indexes for it; and

(c)ensure that before the appeal book is filed each party to the appeal, or their lawyer, checks it and signs a Form 14A (Certificate of correctness of appeal book); and

(d)file the appeal book on or before the date set by the registrar when settling the indexes for it.

(2)On the application of a party, a registrar may dispense with the requirement in subrule (1)(c).

[Rule 41 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4533‑4.]

Division 4 — Matters prior to the hearing of any appeal

42.Application of Division

This Division applies to any appeal, civil or criminal, unless the contrary intention appears.

42A.Matters requiring leave

The leave of a single judge is required for these actions —

(a)the addition or removal of a party after an appeal has been commenced;

(b)the amendment of a document that has been filed;

(c)the issue of a subpoena that would require a person to give oral evidence or produce anything to the Court of Appeal.

[Rule 42A inserted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4534.]

43.Single judge’s jurisdiction

(1)In this rule a reference to making an interim order includes a reference to amending or cancelling an interim order.

(2)A single judge has jurisdiction to do any of the following —

(a)to extend or to refuse to extend the time within which the appeal can be commenced or to refer the question to the hearing of the appeal;

(b)to give or to refuse to give leave to appeal or to refer the question to the hearing of the appeal;

(c)in a criminal appeal, to exercise the Court of Appeal’s functions under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 27;

(d)to amend any ground of appeal;

(e)to add any ground of appeal;

(f)to strike out any ground of appeal that does not have a reasonable prospect of succeeding or does not comply with these rules or any order made under them;

(fa)to strike out an appeal notice if —

(i)the appeal is incompetent or has not been validly commenced; or

(ii)a Form 3 (Service certificate) is not filed within 7 days after the last date on which the appeal could have been commenced;

(g)to dismiss the appeal if —

(i)none of the grounds of appeal has a reasonable prospect of succeeding; or

(ii)the appellant has not obeyed these rules or any order made under them;

(ga)if a respondent to an appeal has not obeyed these rules or any order made under them, to bar the respondent from taking part in the appeal;

(h)to make an interim order in an appeal;

(i)to make an interim order before a respondent is served with the appeal notice;

(j)to make an interim order subject to a condition, including, without limiting that power, a condition that requires —

(i)a party to give an undertaking;

(ii)a party to give security for the costs of the other party to the appeal;

(k)to adjourn proceedings in relation to the making of an interim order from time to time;

(ka)to refer any application for an interim order to the hearing of the appeal;

(l)to make any order that it is necessary or convenient to make as a result of an order made under any of the above paragraphs.

(3)An order made under subrule (2), as varied by the Court of Appeal under the Act section 61(4), is to be taken to be an order made by the Court of Appeal unless it is set aside by the Court of Appeal under that section.

[Rule 43 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4534‑5]

44.Interim order, applying for

(1)At any time after an appeal is commenced and before it is concluded a party may apply for an interim order or an order amending or cancelling an interim order.

(2)To make such an application, the party must file —

(a)a Form 9 (Application in an appeal); and

(b)an affidavit by the applicant or the applicant’s lawyer or both stating why the interim order is wanted,

unless —

(c)these rules (other than the RSC) provide otherwise; or

(d)another written law provides otherwise; or

(e)a single judge orders otherwise.

[Rule 44 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4535‑6.]

45.Consenting to orders

(1)The parties to an appeal may consent to an interim or other order, other than an urgent appeal order, being made by filing a Form 10.

(2)If the order is not one a registrar can make, the registrar must refer the Form 10 to a single judge who may make the order if it is just to do so.

(3)If the order is one a registrar can make, the registrar may make the order if it is just to do so.

[Rule 45 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4544.]

46.Urgent appeal order, nature of

(1)An urgent appeal order in relation to an appeal is an order that the appeal is an urgent appeal that must be heard as quickly as practicable consistent with the proper administration of justice.

(2)An urgent appeal order must include an order setting a timetable for the various requirements of these rules and may include —

(a)an order dispensing with or modifying any such requirement;

(b)any order that will or may facilitate the appeal being heard as quickly as practicable consistent with the proper administration of justice.

47.Case management

(1)In this rule —

approved mediator means —

(a)the Court of Appeal Registrar; or

(b)an approved mediator as defined in the RSC Order 4A rule 1.

(2)At any time after an appeal is commenced, a single judge has jurisdiction to make any order that will or may facilitate the appeal, or any application for an interim order in the appeal, being conducted and concluded efficiently, economically and expeditiously.

(3)Without limiting subrule (2), a single judge has jurisdiction —

(a)to order a party to file an affidavit as to any matter;

(b)to dispense with or modify a requirement of these rules;

(c)to require any or all of the parties to confer or exchange letters in order to identify the issues between them, to resolve as many of them as possible, and to identify the issues to be decided by the Court of Appeal;

(d)to make an order relating to the admission of additional evidence, either before or at the hearing of the appeal, by the Court of Appeal;

(e)to limit the time that a party has to present oral submissions at the hearing of the appeal;

(f)to limit the issues on which oral submissions may be made at the hearing of the appeal;

(g)if the appeal has been listed for hearing, to cancel the hearing on that date;

(h)to make any order it is necessary or convenient to make as a result of an order made under any of the above paragraphs.

(4)An order made under subrule (3)(c) requiring the parties to confer may require them to confer before an approved mediator but, unless the party consents, the order must not result in a party being liable to remunerate a mediator.

[Rule 47 amended in Gazette 16 Aug 2017 p. 4427.]

48.Applications for adjournments to be made promptly

An application for an adjournment of the hearing of an appeal must be made immediately it is known that an adjournment is wanted.

49.Offers of compromise

(1)In a civil appeal, the RSC Order 24A applies as if —

(a)any reference to “plaintiff” were a reference to “appellant”;

(b)any reference to “defendant” were a reference to “respondent”;

(c)any reference to “the trial” were a reference to “the hearing of the appeal”;

(d)the time prescribed for paragraphs (1) and (5) of Order 24A rule 3 were immediately before the Court of Appeal’s judgment is, or reasons for judgment are, first made known to the parties to the appeal;

(e)the reference in Order 24A rule 8(1)(a)(i) to “the proceedings” were a reference to “the appeal”;

(f)the reference in Order 24A rule 8(1)(a)(ii) to “the defence” were a reference to “the respondent’s answer”.

(2)For the purposes of subrule (1), a single judge has the jurisdiction conferred on “the Court” under the RSC Order 24A.

(3)In a civil appeal where the respondent also appeals against the primary court’s decision, subrule (1) applies as if any reference to “appellant” were a reference to “respondent”.

50.Court to be advised immediately of settlement etc.

If the parties to an appeal agree to settle the whole or any part of an appeal, they must notify the Court of Appeal Office immediately.

Division 5 — Matters prior to the hearing of a criminal appeal

51.Application of Division

This Division applies to criminal appeals.

52.Applications for certain orders under CAA s. 40(1)

An application for an order under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 40(1)(a) to (e) must be filed with an affidavit stating the evidence to be produced or given and how it is relevant to the grounds of appeal or to an issue in the appeal.

53.Single judge’s jurisdiction

A single judge has jurisdiction to make any order under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 40 or 43(3) or (4).

54.Witnesses required by the Court of Appeal

(1)The Criminal Procedure Act 2004 Part 5 Division 7 and Schedule 4, and the Criminal Procedure Rules 2005, apply for the purpose of compelling a witness to attend the Court of Appeal, or an examiner appointed by an appeal court under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 40.

(2)If under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 40(1) the Court of Appeal orders a witness to attend the court or an examiner appointed by the court, then unless the court orders otherwise —

(a)the party that applied for the order under section 40(1) must serve the witness summons; and

(b)the witness summons must be served under the Criminal Procedure Act 2004 section 162.

55.Proceedings before an examiner

(1)If under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 40(1)(c) the Court of Appeal orders that a witness is to be examined before a person other than the court (the examiner), a registrar must —

(a)fix the time and place for the examination;

(b)notify the examiner;

(c)notify the parties;

(d)issue a witness summons to the witness; and

(e)if necessary, notify the party that applied for the order of the party’s duty under rule 54(2)(a) to serve the summons.

(2)An examination of a witness before an examiner must be on oath and be recorded.

(3)The examiner may administer an oath to the witness.

(4)A party to the appeal is entitled to be present at and take part in the examination unless it is ordered otherwise.

(5)On completing the examination, the examiner must —

(a)certify that the recorded version of the witness’s evidence is accurate; and

(b)give a registrar the certified recorded version and any record or thing referred to by the witness.

(6)A registrar must keep the material supplied by the examiner in safe custody and deal with it in accordance with the directions of the Court of Appeal.

[Rule 55 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543‑4.]

56.Special commissioners and assessors (CAA s. 40(1))

(1)If the Court of Appeal makes an order under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 40(1)(f), the order —

(a)must identify the special commissioner who has been appointed;

(b)must specify the records to be examined, or the scientific or local investigation to be conducted;

(c)may give orders as to how and when the examination or investigation is to be conducted and as to whether and how any party to the appeal or matter may participate in it;

(d)may give any other orders necessary for the conduct of the examination or investigation.

(2)If the Court of Appeal makes an order under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 40(1)(g), the order —

(a)must identify the assessor who has been appointed;

(b)must specify the special expert knowledge for which the assessor has been appointed;

(c)may specify any question that the assessor is to assist the Court of Appeal with;

(d)may give orders as to how and when the assessor is to assist the court;

(e)may give any other orders necessary for the use by the Court of Appeal of the assessor.

(3)A registrar must serve the order on the special commissioner or the assessor together with any records that the Court of Appeal orders to be served.

(4)A special commissioner or assessor must give any report required of him or her by the Court of Appeal to a registrar who must deal with it in accordance with the court’s orders.

[Rule 56 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543‑4.]

Division 6 — Hearing an appeal

57.Hearing date to be set

When a date for hearing an appeal is set, a registrar must send each party a Form 15.

[Rule 57 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543‑4.]

[58.Deleted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4536.]

Division 7 — Concluding an appeal

59.Discontinuing an appeal

(1)The appellant may discontinue an appeal by filing and serving a Form 16.

(2)If the appellant is a person under disability (as defined in the RSC Order 70 rule 1), the Form 16 does not have effect unless it is approved by a single judge.

(3)An application for the approval of a single judge must be filed with an affidavit and, unless a single judge orders otherwise, an opinion by an independent lawyer.

(4)Unless the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 35 applies or a single judge orders otherwise, an appellant who discontinues an appeal must pay the respondent’s costs in respect of the appeal which must be taxed if they are not agreed.

(5)In an appeal where the respondent also appeals against the primary court’s decision, subrules (1) to (4) and Form 16 apply with any necessary changes.

(6)The discontinuance of an appeal by the appellant does not affect any appeal by a respondent who also appeals against the primary court’s decision.

60.Settling an appeal

(1)The parties to an appeal may file a Form 10, modified as necessary, stating the final order that the parties consent to being made in the appeal.

(2)When a consent notice is filed, a registrar must refer it to a single judge who may direct the registrar —

(a)to issue a final order in accordance with the notice; or

(b)to notify the parties that the judge will decide the final orders at a hearing.

(3)A settlement or compromise of an appeal to which a person under disability (as defined in the RSC Order 70 rule 1) is a party has no effect unless it is approved by a single judge.

(4)An application for the approval of a single judge must be filed with an affidavit and, unless a single judge orders otherwise, an opinion by an independent lawyer.

[Rule 60 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4544.]

61.Guideline judgments

(1)This rule does not limit the Sentencing Act 1995 section 143.

(2)A guideline judgment may be given in respect of one appeal or in respect of a number of appeals, even if they are not heard together.

(3)A guideline judgment may be given on the application of a party to an appeal or by the Court of Appeal on its own initiative.

62.Criminal appeals, certificate of conclusion of

(1)This rule applies to any criminal appeal.

(2)When the appeal is concluded, a registrar must issue a Form 17.

(3)The Form 17 is the formal record of the Court of Appeal and forms part of the Supreme Court’s record.

(4)A registrar must send a copy of the Form 17 to —

(a)the primary court, unless it is the Supreme Court;

(b)the Commissioner of Police;

(c)the chief executive officer of the department of the public service principally assisting the Minister who administers the Sentence Administration Act 2003;

(d)the chairperson of the Parole Board;

(e)if the case requires, the chairperson of the Mentally Impaired Accused Review Board; and

(f)any other person to whom an order made by the Court of Appeal in the appeal is directed.

(5)If a warrant is issued to enforce a judgment or order of the Court of Appeal, a copy of the Form 17 must be sent with the warrant to any person to whom the warrant is directed.

[Rule 62 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543‑4.]

63.Other appeals, final orders on

(1)This rule applies to any appeal that is not a criminal appeal.

(2)When the appeal is concluded other than due to it being discontinued, a registrar must either —

(a)prepare, sign and seal the judgment or order of the Court of Appeal or a single judge, as the case requires; or

(b)direct a party to submit 1 or more drafts of the judgment or order, and a final version of it for signing and sealing.

[(3)deleted]

(4)A registrar must send a copy of the Court of Appeal’s judgment or order to the primary court, unless it is the Supreme Court.

[Rule 63 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4536 and 4543.]

64.Return of exhibits

(1)After an appeal is concluded, a registrar must, unless the Court of Appeal has ordered otherwise —

(a)return any record or thing given to the Court of Appeal by the primary court to the primary court;

(b)by a written notice, require the party who tendered any record or thing that was admitted in evidence by the Court of Appeal to collect it from the court; and

(c)by a written notice, require any person who, under a summons or subpoena, produced any record or thing to the Court of Appeal that was not admitted in evidence, to collect it from the court

(2)A registrar must not act under subrule (1) until —

(a)the time for commencing proceedings in the High Court in relation to the appeal has expired; or

(b)if proceedings in the High Court in relation to the appeal are commenced before that time expires, the proceedings are concluded.

(3)Despite subrule (2), a registrar —

(a)may dispose of a record or thing that the registrar considers is dangerous to retain or return to a person; or

(b)may release a record or thing to a person who is entitled to custody of it if the registrar considers that —

(i)it is dangerous, impracticable or inconvenient to retain the record or thing under this rule; or

(ii)it is necessary for that person to have use of the record or thing.

(4)If under subrule (3)(b) a registrar releases a record or thing to a person, the registrar may require the person, as a condition of being given it, to give a written undertaking to the Court of Appeal as to the care maintenance and custody of it and its re‑delivery to the court.

(5)If a record or thing remains in the possession of the Court of Appeal after reasonable steps have been taken to identify a person who is entitled to possession of it and to require the person to collect it from the court, a single judge may order a registrar to destroy it or dispose of it in some other way.

[Rule 64 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4543‑4.]

65.Enforcing judgments and orders

(1)A single judge has jurisdiction to make any order, and to issue any warrant or other document, to enforce a judgment or order of the Court of Appeal.

(2)A warrant to arrest an accused must be in the form of Form 1 in the Criminal Procedure Regulations 2005 Schedule 1.

(3)A warrant to remand an accused in custody must be in the form of Form 2 in the Criminal Procedure Regulations 2005 Schedule 1.

(4)A warrant of commitment to imprison an offender must be in the form of Form 1 in the Sentencing Regulations 1996 Schedule 1.

66.Costs

(1)In this rule —

costs includes disbursements.

(2)If a party does not file a document required by these rules within the time specified for doing so in —

(a)these rules; or

(b)an order made under these rules, other than an order that extends any such time,

the party is not entitled to the costs of preparing and filing the document unless the Court of Appeal orders otherwise.

(2A)If —

(a)an order made under these rules extends the time for filing a document specified in these rules or in an order made under them; and

(b)the document is filed within that extended time,

the party who filed it is entitled to the costs of preparing and filing the document unless the order extending time is accompanied by an order that, unless the Court of Appeal orders otherwise, the party is not so entitled.

(3)Subrules (2) and (2A) do not prevent the Court of Appeal from making an order under the RSC Order 66 rule 5 in respect of the costs of preparing and filing the document concerned.

(4)The costs of preparing and settling the indexes to, and of preparing, filing and serving, the appeal book are costs in the appeal unless the Court of Appeal orders otherwise.

(5)The costs of copies of unnecessary documents or of copies of unnecessary parts of documents will not be allowed.

[Rule 66 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4536‑7.]

Part 6  Referred and other CA matters

67.Referring a legal issue to the Court of Appeal

(1)In this rule —

legal issue includes a question or point of law, a stated case and a petition;

refer to includes to reserve for.

(2)This rule applies to and in respect of any legal issue that may be referred to the Court of Appeal under any written law.

(3)The requirements of this rule are in addition to any requirements of the written law under which a legal issue may be referred to the Court of Appeal.

(4)To refer a legal issue to the Court of Appeal, the court or person who may refer the issue must file a Form 18.

(5)The Form 18 and any documents attached to it must be served on the parties in the referring court and on any person who the referring person considers has a direct interest in the issue.

(6)When completing a Form 18 —

(a)if there is more than one legal issue being referred, they must be in numbered paragraphs; and

(b)the circumstances out of which the legal issue being referred arose must refer to all the facts out of which the issue arose; and

(c)the circumstances out of which the legal issue being referred arose must be set out in numbered paragraphs; and

(d)the list of materials to be considered must include any document to which the Court of Appeal may need to refer to decide the legal issue.

[(e)deleted]

[Rule 67 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4537‑8.]

68.Dealing with referred and other CA matters

(1)This rule applies to the following CA matters —

(a)a legal issue to which rule 67 applies and that has been referred to the Court of Appeal under that rule;

(b)an application for a prerogative writ that, under the RSC Order 56, is directed to be decided by the Court of Appeal;

(c)a rule nisi or an order to show cause that, under the Act section 43(2) or the RSC Order 56, is made returnable before the Court of Appeal;

(d)a review order that, under an order made under the RSC Order 56A, is to be heard by the Court of Appeal;

(e)an application for a writ of habeas corpus ad subjiciendum that, under the RSC Order 57 —

(i)is directed to be made to the Court of Appeal; or

(ii)is made to the Court of Appeal;

(f)a writ of habeas corpus ad subjiciendum that, under an order made under the RSC Order 57, is returnable before the Court of Appeal;

(g)an appeal that, under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 section 13, has been ordered to be dealt with by the Court of Appeal;

(h)any other CA matter that is neither a criminal appeal nor a civil appeal.

(2)A single judge has jurisdiction to make any order that will or may facilitate the CA matter being conducted and decided efficiently, economically and expeditiously.

(3)Without limiting subrule (2), a single judge has jurisdiction —

(a)if it is uncertain who are the parties to the proceedings in the Court of Appeal in respect of the CA matter, to decide the question;

(b)to order a particular party to have the conduct of the CA matter;

(c)to order that a rule in Part 5, with or without modifications, applies to the CA matter;

(d)to modify or dispense with the operation of a rule in, or any order made by the General Division under, the RSC in respect of the CA matter.

Part 7  Miscellaneous

69.Removal of District Court appeal into Court of Appeal

(1)An application under the Magistrates Court (Civil Proceedings) Act 2004 section 41 must be made by filing a Form 9, modified as necessary and excluding the item “Conference between parties”, within 28 days after the date on which the appeal to the District Court was commenced.

(2)If the Court of Appeal makes an order under the Magistrates Court (Civil Proceedings) Act 2004 section 41(3) —

(a)the appellant in the appeal to the District Court must file a Form 2 within 3 days after the date of the order; and

(b)these rules apply to the conduct of the appeal in the Court of Appeal.

 

Schedule 1  Forms

[r. 3]

1.Appeal notice (criminal) (r. 28)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Appeal notice (criminal)

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Offender

Full name:

Date of birth:

Primary court’s decision

Primary court

Indictment No./SJA No.

Date of decision

Judicial officer

at

Decision details1

Conviction recorded2

Sentence imposed3

Other orders made4

 

Appeal details

Notice of appeal

 

[Tick one or more boxes]

The appellant applies to the Court of Appeal for leave to appeal against the above conviction.

The appellant applies to the Court of Appeal for leave to appeal against —

the above sentence

the above order

5 The appellant applies to the Court of Appeal for leave to appeal against the above decision.

Draft grounds of appeal6

1.

Notice to the respondent

If you want to take part in this appeal you must file a Form 4 under the Supreme Court (Court of Appeal) Rules 2005 within 7 days after you are served with this notice and serve it on the appellant.

Last date for appealing

Last date:

Is an extension of time needed? Yes/No

Legal representation

Is the appellant legally represented in this appeal? Yes/No

Is the appellant applying for legal aid? Yes/No

Appellant’s details for service7

Name

Street address

Telephone

Email address

Reference No.

 

 

Fax No.

Signature of appellant or lawyer

 

Appellant/Appellant’s lawyer

Date:

Notes to Form 1 —

1.If the appeal is not against a conviction or sentence or other order made as a result of a conviction (e.g. an appeal under the Criminal Appeals Act 2004 s. 23(1)(c), 23(2)(c), 24(1)(c), 24(2), 25(2), 25(3) or 26), delete the following and describe the decision being appealed.

2.Describe the offence. E.g. Dangerous driving causing death. If there is more than one conviction, put the details of the other convictions, sentences and orders on an attachment.

3.State the sentence. E.g. Imprisonment for 18 months with a parol eligibility order cumulative on the sentence for robbery.

4.State any other order made. E.g. Disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver’s licence for 4 years.

5.Tick this box if the appeal is against a decision other than a conviction or sentence or other order made as a result of a conviction. See note 1.

6.Set out the draft grounds in numbered paragraphs.

7.If the appellant is represented by a lawyer, the appellant’s details below must be the lawyer’s. If the appellant is self-represented, the details must be the appellant’s personal details.

[8.deleted]

[Form 1 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4538.]

2.Appeal notice (civil) (r. 29)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Appeal notice (civil)

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Primary court’s decision

Primary court

Case number

Parties

Date of decision

Judicial officer

 

Decision details1

 

Appeal details

Notice of appeal

The appellant appeals to the Court of Appeal against the above decision.

Act that allows the appeal2

section:

Notice to the respondent

If you want to take part in this appeal you must file a Form 4 under the Supreme Court (Court of Appeal) Rules 2005 within 7 days after you are served with this notice and serve it on the appellant.

Last date for appealing

Last date:

Is an extension of time needed? Yes/No

Leave to appeal

Is leave to appeal needed? Yes/No

If yes, state the Act and section requiring leave:

Legal representation

Is the appellant legally represented in this appeal? Yes/No

Is the appellant applying for legal aid? Yes/No

Appellant’s details for service3

Name

Street address

Telephone

Email address

Reference No.

 

 

Fax No.

Signature of appellant or lawyer

 

 

Appellant/Appellant’s lawyer

Date:

Notes to Form 2 —

1.Examples:

·Judgment against the defendant for $70 000.

·Dismissal of negligence action.

2.State the short title of the Act under which the appeal is being made.

3.If the appellant is represented by a lawyer, the appellant’s details below must be the lawyer’s. If the appellant is self-represented, the details must be the appellant’s personal details.

[4.deleted]

[Form 2 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4538‑9.]

3.Service certificate (r. 28(7) & 29(5))

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Service certificate

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Certificate

I certify that on [date] at [place] [name of server] served the respondent personally with —

a copy of an appeal notice dated [date]; and

a copy of every other document that was filed with the appeal notice.

I undertake to file an affidavit of service if the Court of Appeal requires me to.

Signature of appellant or lawyer

 

 

Appellant/Appellant’s lawyer

Date:

Notes to Form 3 —

1.Delete if no documents are required under rule 28(1)(d) or 29(1)(d). Refer to rule 28(1)(d) in a criminal appeal and to rule 29(1)(d) in a civil appeal.

[Form 3 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4539.]

4.Notice of respondent’s intention (r. 31)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No.:

Notice of respondent’s intention

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Notice

[Tick one box]

The respondent intends to take part in this appeal.

The respondent does not intend to take part in this appeal and will accept any order made by the Court of Appeal in the appeal other than as to costs.

Legal representation

Is the respondent legally represented in this appeal? Yes/No

Is the respondent applying for legal aid? Yes/No

Respondent’s details for service1

Name

Street address

Telephone

Email address

Reference No.

 

 

Fax No.

Signature of respondent or lawyer

 

Respondent/Respondent’s lawyer

Date:

Note to Form 4 —

1.If the respondent is represented by a lawyer, the respondent’s details below must be the lawyer’s. If the respondent is self‑represented, the details must be the respondent’s personal details.

[Form 4 inserted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4539.]

4A.Notice of respondent’s cross appeal (r. 31A)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No.:

Notice of respondent’s cross appeal

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Notice

The respondent also appeals against the primary court’s decision specified in the appellant’s appeal notice.

Last date for appealing

Last date:

Is an extension of time needed? Yes/No

Leave to appeal

Is leave to appeal needed? Yes/No

If yes, state the Act and section requiring leave:

Signature of respondent or lawyer

 

Respondent/Respondent’s lawyer

Date:

[Form 4A inserted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4540.]

5.Lawyer’s notice of acting (Part 4)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Lawyer’s notice of acting

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Client

Appellant/Respondent

Notice

The lawyer or firm of practitioners named below is acting for the above client in this appeal.

Lawyer or firm of practitioners

Name

Street address

Telephone

Email address

Reference No.

 

 

Fax No.

Signature of lawyer

 

Date:

[Form 5 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4540.]

5A.Service certificate by lawyer ceasing to act (r. 24(3))

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No.:

Service certificate by lawyer ceasing to act

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Details of order giving leave to cease to act

On [date] the Court of Appeal made an order giving leave for [name of lawyer] to cease to act for the *appellant/ respondent.

Certificate

I certify that on [date] at [place] [name of server] served [name of party], the *appellant/respondent, with a copy of that order.

I undertake to file an affidavit of service if the Court of Appeal requires me to.

Last known address

The last known geographical address of the *appellant/ respondent is1

Signature of lawyer

 

 

Name of lawyer

Date:

Notes to Form 5A —

*Delete the inapplicable.

1.Geographical address: see RSC Order 71A rule 2.

[Form 5A inserted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4540‑1.]

6.Notice of self-representation (r. 24)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Notice of self-representation

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Notice

I, the [party], no longer have a lawyer acting for me in this appeal.

My address for service is set out below.

Address for service

Street address

Telephone

Email address

Reference No.

 

 

Fax No.

Signature of party

 

Date:

7.Appellant’s case (r. 32)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Appellant’s case

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Notice

Attached to this form are these documents in this order —

·Appellant’s grounds of appeal

·Appellant’s submissions

·Appellant’s legal authorities

·Orders wanted

·1 Draft chronology

·Draft appeal book indexes

Certificate

I certify —

·that in preparing the attached documents I have fully prepared the appellant’s case; and

·that in all respects, other than the preparation of the appeal book, the appellant is ready for the hearing of the appeal.

Time estimate

I estimate it will take minutes/hours to orally present the appellant’s case at the hearing of this appeal.

Signature of appellant or lawyer

 

 

Appellant/Appellant’s lawyer

Date:

Notes to Form 7 —

1.Delete this if the appeal is an interlocutory civil appeal or a sentence appeal.

[Form 7 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4541.]

8.Respondent’s answer (r. 33)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Respondent’s answer

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Notice

Attached to this form are these documents in this order —

·Respondent’s submissions

·Respondent’s notice of contention

·Respondent’s legal authorities

·1 Reply to the appellant’s draft chronology

·Reply to the appellant’s draft indexes

Certificate

I certify —

·that in preparing the attached documents I have fully prepared the respondent’s answer; and

·that in all respects the respondent is ready for the hearing of the appeal.

Time estimate

I estimate it will take minutes/hours to orally present the respondent’s answer at the hearing of this appeal.

Signature of respondent or lawyer

 

 

Respondent/Respondent’s lawyer

Date:

Notes to Form 8 —

1.Delete this if the appeal is an interlocutory civil appeal or a sentence appeal.

[Form 8 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4541.]

9.Application in an appeal (r. 44)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Application in an appeal

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Applicant

Appellant/Respondent

Application1

The applicant applies for —

 

Conference between parties

[Tick one box]

The parties to this application have conferred about the issues giving rise to this application but have not resolved them. The unresolved issues are:2

 

The parties to this application have not conferred about the issues giving rise to this application because:3

 

Signature of applicant or lawyer

 

 

Applicant/Applicant’s lawyer

Date:

Notes to Form 9 —

1.State —

·the order or orders sought; and

·the written law and provision under which the application is made.

2.List the unresolved issues in numbered paragraphs.

3.State the reasons why the parties have not conferred.

[Form 9 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4541‑2.]

10.Consent notice (r. 45 & 60)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Consent notice

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Consent

We consent to the following order being made —

 

Signature of appellant or lawyer

 

 

Appellant/Appellant’s lawyer

Date:

Signature of respondent or lawyer

 

 

Respondent/Respondent’s lawyer

Date:

11.Affidavit cover sheet (r. 21(3))

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Affidavit1

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Person making affidavit

 

Date made

 

Purpose

 

Filed by

Appellant/Respondent

Index2

Contents

Page

1.Affidavit of Vincent van Gogh

2.Annexure VVG 1 — M J Citizen’s birth certificate

3.Annexure VVG 2 — Letter from J Smith to T Jones dated 3 March 1999

1

7

8

Notes to Form 11 —

1.The affidavit must comply with the RSC Order 37.

2.The index must comply with the RSC Order 37 Rule 2(7). The above form contains in italics an example of an index.

12.Request for hearing (r. 19)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Request for hearing

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Request

The appellant/respondent requests a hearing of the matter decided provisionally by [name of judge] on [date] in this appeal.

Signature of party requesting or lawyer

 

Appellant/Respondent/

Appellant’s lawyer/Respondent’s lawyer

Date:

13.Application for review of single judge’s or registrar’s decision (r. 8 & 15)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Application for review of single judge’s or registrar’s decision

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Decision to be reviewed

Decision maker

Date of decision

Brief description

 

Applicant

Appellant/Respondent

Application

[*Delete one]

The applicant applies to the *Court of Appeal/a single judge of appeal to set aside or vary the above decision.

Grounds of this application1

1.

Stay

Is a stay of proceedings needed? Yes/No

If yes, state the order and why it is needed:

Orders wanted

 

Signature of applicant or lawyer

 

 

Applicant/Applicant’s lawyer

Date:

Notes to Form 13 —

1.Set out the grounds in numbered paragraphs.

14.Appeal book, cover page (r. 39(5))

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Green Appeal Book

Volume 2 of 31

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Appellant’s details for service2

Name

Street address

Telephone

Email address

Reference No.

 

 

Fax No.

Respondent’s details for service2

Name

Street address

Telephone

Email address

Reference No.

 

 

Fax No.

Notes to Form 14 —

1.This must reflect the part [E.g. White Appeal Book], and the number of the volume of the part in which the cover page appears. If the part consists of only one volume, omit the reference to “Volume”. If the appeal is a sentence appeal and the appeal book is one volume only, this must read “Appeal Book”.

2.If the party is represented by a lawyer, these details must be the lawyer’s. If the party is self-represented, these details must be the party’s personal details.

14A.Certificate of correctness of appeal book (r. 41(c))

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No.:

Certificate of correctness of appeal book

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Appellant’s certificate

The appellant certifies that —

(a)this appeal book contains those materials, and only those materials, necessary for this appeal; and

(b)each document copied has been compared to the original document and is correct; and

(c)all documents copied are legible.

Signature of appellant or lawyer

 

 

Appellant/Appellant’s lawyer

Date:

Respondent’s certificate

The respondent certifies that —

(a)this appeal book contains those materials, and only those materials, necessary for this appeal; and

(b)each document copied has been compared to the original document and is correct; and

(c)all documents copied are legible.

Signature of respondent or lawyer

 

 

Respondent/Respondent’s lawyer

Date:

[Form 14A inserted in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4542.]

15.Notice of hearing date (r. 57)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Notice of hearing date

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Hearing date

This appeal will be heard by the Court of Appeal at [place] on [date] at [time] or as soon after then as possible.

Time limits

The following time limits will apply to the parties when making oral submissions to the court —

Signature of registrar

 

Court of Appeal Registrar

Date:

16.Discontinuance notice (r. 59)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Discontinuance notice

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Notice

The *appellant/respondent discontinues this *appeal/the cross appeal in this appeal.

Notice

The appellant discontinues this appeal.

Signature of appellant or lawyer

 

 

Appellant/Appellant’s lawyer

Date:

Note to Form 16 —

*Delete the inapplicable.

[Form 16 amended in Gazette 22 Aug 2017 p. 4542‑3.]

17.Certificate of conclusion of criminal appeal (r. 62)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Certificate of conclusion of criminal appeal

Parties to the appeal

Appellant

Respondent

Primary court’s decision that was appealed

Primary court

Indictment No.

Case name

Date of decision

Judicial officer

 

Result of appeal

Court of Appeal proceedings1

Date(s):

Presiding judges of appeal:

 

Final outcome2

Date:

 

Certificate

I certify that the information in this certificate is true and correct.

Signature

 

Court of Appeal Registrar

Date:

Notes to Form 17 —

1.Do not complete if appeal is discontinued.

2.Set out the Court of Appeal’s judgment and any consequential orders made or, if the appeal was discontinued, that it was discontinued.

18.Referral of legal issue to Court of Appeal (r. 67)

Supreme Court of Western Australia

Court of Appeal

No:

Referral of legal issue to Court of Appeal

Parties to the primary court case

 

Primary court case details1

In the [name of court] at [place] on [date],

Law allowing the referral2

This referral is made under:

Legal issue referred

The following legal issue is referred to the Court of Appeal:

How the issue arose

The legal issue arose out of the following circumstances:

Material to be considered3

The material that ought to be considered by the Court of Appeal is:

Signature of judge or person

referring

 

 

[Name and title of person referring]

Date:

Notes to Form 18 —

1.Set out the nature of the primary court case. Examples:

·… the accused was indicted on the attached indictment …

·… the plaintiff sued the defendant in negligence …

2.State the short title and section of the Act under which the referral is being made.

3.List the records, documents, transcripts and exhibits to be considered by the Court of Appeal.

 

Notes

1This is a compilation of the Supreme Court (Court of Appeal) Rules 2005 and includes the amendments made by the other written laws referred to in the following table.

Compilation table

Citation

Gazettal

Commencement

Supreme Court (Court of Appeal) Rules 2005

29 Apr 2005 p. 1803-75

2 May 2005 (see r. 2)

Supreme Court Rules Amendment Rules 2017 Pt. 3

16 Aug 2017 p. 4391‑427

30 Aug 2017 (see r. 2(c))

Supreme Court (Court of Appeal) Amendment Rules 2017

22 Aug 2017 p. 4517‑44

r. 1 and 2: 22 Aug 2017 (see r. 2(a));
Rules other than r. 1 and 2: 5 Sep 2017 (see r. 2(b))

 

 

Defined terms

 

[This is a list of terms defined and the provisions where they are defined. The list is not part of the law.]

Defined termProvision(s)

Act3(1)

appeal3(1)

appeal notice3(1)

appellant3(1)

appellant’s grounds of appeal33(1)

approved mediator47(1)

CA matter3(1)

civil appeal3(1)

concluded3(1)

costs66(1)

criminal appeal3(1)

cross appeal31A(1)

decision3(1)

examiner55(1)

file3(1)

Form3(1)

interim order3(1)

interlocutory civil appeal3(1)

lawyer3(1)

legal issue67(1)

party3(1)

primary court3(1)

primary court case30(1)

primary court’s decision3(1)

primary court’s transcript3(1)

provisional decision19(2)

record3(1)

refer to67(1)

registrar3(1)

reviewable decision14

RSC3(1)

sentence appeal3(1)

single judge3(1)

urgent appeal order3(1)

working day3(1)